Edmundas Saladžius “On the Same Night” | MO
Edmundas Saladžius “On the Same Night”
2020 03 11 – 2020 05 25

MO Museum is currently closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. We apologize for any inconvenience caused and thank you for your understanding.

We’re following all the latest information and will inform about the opening of the museum once the opening date is confirmed.

On the 11th of March, the exhibition “On the Same Night” by the graphic artist Edmundas Saladžius will be opened in the MO Museum Lobby. The artist was never afraid of social themes, emphasized the connection between art and politics, his works show his views on the political system of that particular time. Therefore, 1989-1992 E. Saladžius’ linocut prints exhibition is symbolically opened March 11, marking the 30th anniversary of the Restoration of Independence of Lithuania.

 

About the exhibition:
30 years ago, on 11th March, news about the restored independence of Lithuania spread all over the world. The significant struggle of the state of Lithuania for the idea of freedom and for human dignity today inspires us and teach not to give up and to defend our fundamental democratic values. The changing moods of the beginning of the independence are reflected in the works of Edmundas Saladžius (b. 1950), one of the most famous Lithuanian graphic artists. He has never concealed his patriotic position and talked about a close connection between art and politics and about the role of an artist as a historian of his country. In his works, the artist boldly – and sometimes fiercely – criticized the political system, the spiritual poverty of the government and social injustice.

Linocuts from the cycle On the Same Night created between 1989 and 1992 are one of the most prominent examples of Saladžius’ social graphic works. According to the artist, the cycle was created as a sign of respect for the people who were guarding the Vilnius TV tower and were killed on 13th January. Also, for the soldiers who were killed at the border of a still fragile state. First and foremost, the artist wanted to express the sense of threat that accompanied the period of changes and joy at the revival of the state with colours – pure and intense, as the long silenced historical truth itself. It seems that is not a white sheet of paper that the black colour is hiding, but the chimeras of fantasies emerging from that period of changes.

Exhibition is in the MO Museum Lobby. 
Entrance with a MO Museum ticket.
MOdernists – free entrance.

From the cycle On the Same Night, 1989–1992
Linocut prints, 61×86 cm; 86×61 cm
MO Museum Collection

Other exhibitions

Mekas Winks Better

2019 11 29 – 2020 08 16

Why Is It Hard to Love?

2020 04 04 – 2020 08 23
Agree